Shibuya

Shibuya

Shibuya is one of Tokyo’s most populated wards, it is a fashion and nightlife center specially popular with young people. Shibuya station being one of Japan’s busiest stations is the epicenter here, taking the Hachiko exit, just in front of the station is the famous Shibuya crossing (scramble/diagonal/x crossing), allegedly the busiest crossing of this type in the world, allowing pedestrians to cross from different directions at the same time. This crossing often appears in TV as a universal symbol (city life, rush hour, Tokyo, Japan…), it was featured for example also in the movie Lost in Translation.

Hachiko

Sculpture of a dog (Hachiko) in front of the Shibuya station (Hachiko exit) reminds of one of the famous stories connected with Shibuya where the dog called Hachiko would wait for his master in front of the station every day. His master (professor at the University of Tokyo) died in 1925 and dog Hachiko would wait every day in front of the station, despite his master never returning, until his own death in 1935. Station staff initially wanted to get rid of Hachiko, however gradually became a well known symbol of the Shibuya station and in 1932 an article about Hachiko published in national newspaper made him well known nation-wide and the “street dog” was since treated like a rockstar.

A bronze statue in front of the station was erected in 1934, with Hachiko being present at the ceremony. Later during the Second World War, the statue was recycled, but after the war, the son of the original sculptor created a new Hachiko statue which stands in front of the station until present and became a popular meeting point which is busy almost in any hour of the day.